Aquarium Co-Op Brine Shrimp Eggs

Aquarium Co-Op Brine Shrimp Eggs (10 grams)

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Aquarium Co-Op Brine Shrimp Eggs

Aquarium Co-Op Brine Shrimp Eggs
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Aquarium Co-Op Brine Shrimp Eggs
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Aquarium Co-Op Brine Shrimp Eggs
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Aquarium Co-Op Brine Shrimp Eggs

Regular price
$5.99
Sale price
$5.99
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 

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  • 90% Hatch Rate
  • Easy Egg Separation
  • The Best Fry Food

Two sizes options: 10 gram vial or 1 pouch of 100 grams of Brine Shrimp Eggs in a resealable pouch with a resealable lid. The 100 gram sized container is meant for hobby level aquarists. This would last you several months with only a few aquariums. The more brine shrimp you hatch and the more aquariums you have, the more you'll consume. 

Live baby brine shrimp is the best food you can offer growing fry for most species of fish. This triggers the natural hunting instinct in fish and helps fish learn to eat. Virtually all baby fish thrive on baby brine shrimp. A Majority of community fish that are adults do as well. Tetras, Rasboras, Danios, Apistos, Rams, Angelfish, Livebearers and more will readily chase down every brine shrimp they can. 

Use Aquarium Co-Op Brine Shrimp Eggs  with saltwater to make live baby brine shrimp. We recommend and use the Ziss brine shrimp hatchery as the hatcheting container.

Hatching the eggs is a simple process of adding 1 tablespoon of salt per liter of water. Then adding  brine shrimp eggs, often people will start with 1 teaspoon of eggs. Depending on the temperature of the water, eggs can start hatching at 18 hours. Cooler temperatures may not seeing hatching until 36 hours. It is recommended to keep temperatures between 75 to 80 for reliable hatches.

Once you have your brine shrimp hatched, remove your air source and let them settle. Baby brine shrimp are attracted to light and will move towards it, we recommend using a light source like a small lamp or a flashlight during collection. A lamp can also be used while they are hatching to provide extra heat.  Eggshells will float and brine shrimp will go towards the light. We put the light towards the bottom of the Ziss Brine Shrimp hatcher and then open the valve to drain the live brine shrimp.  From there you can rinse your brine shrimp with a brine shrimp net or sieve to remove the saltwater and wastewater. Or you can feed with the salt water to give your plants a boost of nutrients. Keep an eye on water parameters when using this method as regular water changes are recommended.

Hatching Tips:

  • Do not use dechlorinate the water, the chlorine helps dissolve the egg shells.
  • Use Marine Salt for even better hatch rates. We use Fritz RPM Marine Salt.
  • Use a lamp to provide a heat source. 

We all have different starting water from our tap, it is expected that a bit of trial and error is required to reach peak hatching technique with your water and your temperatures. It's a bit like cooking, you can have all the ingredients, but there is a bit of experience needed to achieve the best results. 

Storage:

It's best to store eggs where they'll be exposed to the least amount of oxygen, humidity and heat. Eggs need moisture, oxygen and warmth to start hatching. Most hobbyists find that keeping the eggs in the fridge or freezer long term is the best solution. While keeping a smaller portion that they'll use up faster in their fish room or in a resealable container. If you leave your brine shrimp eggs out, they'll still hatch, but you can see the hatch rate go down over time. In my own testing, eggs sitting in a fish room for months still hatched great. Eggs in a fridge for years still hatched well. 

We store the cans of eggs in a cooler and ship them this way to help ensure freshness. While not required, we go the extra step. We only want to help prevent them from getting far too hot in a mailbox which is usually well over 100 degrees. Prolonged exposure to 80 degrees or higher, and oxygen or moisture may start the hatching process.  This is a non issue while shipping, however once you've opened them, best practice is to store them in the fridge.

 

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